Luigi Russolo

Russolo was Futurist and also an early experimental and noise music innovator. He created noise machines to replicate the sounds of industry and the modern world. He then worked these sounds into compositions

Noise Machines

(Listen to the machines here: http://www.ubu.com/sound/russolo_l.html)

The Art of Noises – 1913

This is Russolo manifesto on sound:

https://reaktorplayer.files.wordpress.com/2013/11/the-art-of-noise.pdf

 

Mi.Mu Gloves

Most of us on our small team are musicians who are tired of being stuck behind computer screens, keyboards, faders, knobs, and buttons to make our music. We feel there could be a better way that is more like the experiences we have with traditional instruments: using the dexterity and mobility of the human body.

(Taken from: http://mimugloves.com/#startpoint)

Imogen Heap – Musician and Founding director of MI.Mu Gloves.

Early Warning Systems (Acoustic Mirrors)

A forerunner of radar, acoustic mirrors were built on the south and northeast coasts of England between about 1916 and the 1930s. The ‘listening ears’ were intended to provide early warning of incoming enemy aircraft.

(taken from: http://www.andrewgrantham.co.uk/soundmirrors/locations/hythe/)

See also: http://www.andrewgrantham.co.uk/soundmirrors/

[Hythe sound mirror, May 2003]30 ft sound mirror, Hythe

Karl-Johan Ekeroth

INTERACTIVE SOUND SCULPTURE

Who doesn’t remember makeshift telephones made of wire and cans? The Invoxicated interactive play sculpture is a bit like that, but a bit more complex, a lot cooler looking, and it actually works! Children can explore the playful qualities of sound by talking into one end of the sculpture to produce sound for the listener on the other end. By bending parts of the sculpture and pressing its various buttons, a multitude of sound effects can be achieved in real time. (Taken from:http://www.yankodesign.com/2011/06/08/interactive-sound-sculpture/)