Studio Weave

Two works by Studio Weave opened my mind  to the possibility of creating sound sculpture and started my interesting the cone as an amplification device. Both works are sight specific.

Lullaby Factory 

<p>Studio Weave has transformed an awkward exterior space landlocked by buildings into the Lullaby Factory &ndash; a secret world that cannot be seen except from inside the hospital and cannot be heard by the naked ear, only by tuning in to its radio frequency or from a few special listening pipes.</p>

Looking up at The Lullaby Factory

Studio Weave has transformed an awkward exterior space landlocked by buildings into the Lullaby Factory – a secret world that cannot be seen except from inside the hospital and cannot be heard by the naked ear, only by tuning in to its radio frequency or from a few special listening pipes.

The Lullaby Factory consists of two complimentary elements: the physical factory that appears to carry out the processes of making lullabies and the soundscape. Composer and sound artist Jessica Curry has composed a brand new lullaby especially for the project, which children can engage with through listening pipes next to the canteen or from the wards by tuning into a special radio station.

There Hear Hears 

Set within the stunning parkland surrounding the Grade I Listed Kedleston Hall, the Hear Heres offer visitors an immersive and interactive experience that invites curiosity.

The Hear Heres are designed to pick up and amplify particular sounds related to their four locations.

National Trust selected Studio Weave from 168 competition entries to design a series of ‘playful incidents’ to whip up a sense of adventure for exploring the parkland surrounding Kedleston Hall, Derbyshire. The term incident was used by Robert Adam, whose first major commission was to design the mansion and estate at Kedleston in the 18th century, to denote a manmade point of interest in a rural setting.

<p>Set within the stunning parkland surrounding the Grade I Listed Kedleston Hall, the Hear Heres offer visitors an immersive and interactive experience that invites curiosity.&nbsp;</p>

<p>National Trust selected Studio Weave from 168 competition entries to design a series of &lsquo;playful incidents&rsquo; to whip up a sense of adventure for exploring the parkland surrounding Kedleston Hall, Derbyshire. The term incident was used by Robert Adam, whose first major commission was to design the mansion and estate at Kedleston in the 18th century, to denote a manmade point of interest in a rural setting.&nbsp;</p><p>The Hear Heres are designed to pick up and amplify particular sounds related to their four locations. A small and agile Hear Here, which wraps around a tree trunk, weaves into the hidden denseness of life on the branches and brings the sounds of the tree down to the curious explorer upon arrival at Kedleston.</p>

 

http://www.studioweave.com/

 

 

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